Category Archive: Festivals

2019 Move Me Festival Is On!

Join us this coming Saturday, March 16, at Kenmore Middle School in Arlington, VA for the 10th Annual Move Me Festival. The event is FREE and runs from 1 – 4 pm. See dancers from Utpalasia and India School perform Bollywood hits and classical Kathak dance. Bring the family and participate in our afternoon workshop to learn folk steps and Bollywood. Enjoy the Bowen McCauley Dance Company and a host of other local dance groups and artists. Get up, get out, get moving! Hope to see you there!

Himalayan Chintang Language Research Project

Researcher Rolf Hotz from Switzerland has been in Nepal since the beginning of 2019 working on his Masters in linguistics. His current topic involves the Chintang language, something the University of Zurich has been studying for quite some time. Their research has been so in-depth that they have even published a dictionary. Chintang is a small, endangered Tibeto-Burman language spoken in the hills of Eastern Nepal (Dhanakuṭā Jillā, Chintāṅā VDC).  The language was only recognized as being distinct from its neighbors in the early 2000’s. People live in villages near the Sunkoshi, Arun and Tamur rivers at an altitude of 900 to 1300 meters and dialects can often vary according to what ‘level’ of the steep trail your hamlet might be located on.

The Chintang Rai follow their Kiranti traditions, which are different from local Hinduism in a number of ways; they do ancestral worship, have other gods, and perform variations of puja. For example, the shaman recites the mundhum (a spiritual, rhythmic and shamanic form of scripture) followed by a veneration of 3 heart stones. Chintang celebrate Nuwagi, the first fruits offering of newly harvested rice, at the time of Dasain. There is also worship of Rajdeu, a Kiranti king (‘master or lord of the land’) and Pomnari, his minister.

Rolf’s focus is one specific aspect of Chintang Rai language: benefactive constructions, or what is usually translated as -ko laagi (‘for someone’) in Nepali. His presence in the villages of the region has caused quite a stir as people are elated to see the interest in their language and culture; he is now revered as a ‘master teacher’ and has made his debut in the local paper. We’ll be following our colleague with great interest and be updating his progress from time to time. Research projects such as this hit home the importance of preserving indigenous languages and it is thanks to individuals like Rolf Hotz that we will have not only data, but an understanding of the significance of Chintang language + Rai culture in a rapidly changing Nepal. To read more, go to https://sangalokhabar.com/57019

Happy Tibetan New Year!

Joy, luck, and prosperity await us as we enter into Tibetan Losar and the Year of the Earth Pig.

Originally, Losar was a festival that celebrated the good fortune of a fruitful harvest, but over time, as Buddhism seeped into Tibetan culture, the holiday took on a different meaning.

Tibetans will celebrate Losar for two weeks starting on the first day of the lunisolar calendar (usually in February or March on our calendar). Chhaang – a smooth and subtle relative of beer – is made into changkol. People eat guthuk, special dumplings filled with tiny objects with different implications. They also eat khapse (recipe here: https://goo.gl/qPrrvF), a deep-fried sweet.

Losar is an opportunity for people to get together with friends and family in anticipation of what the New Year will bring and exchange greetings by saying, “Tashi Delek”, which means “Blessings and be well”.

Happy Kukur Puja!

 

Hinduism’s second most beloved festival – Tihar – is in its second day, celebrating Kukur Puja, during which furry friends are garlanded with flowers, given tika, and offered special treats. Dogs have long been seen as man’s faithful companion, and so this holiday honors and worships them. Devotees take holy baths and light yamadeep lamps, facing them south on the river in the hope that they will not go to Hell, but rather be accompanied by the Kukur to Heaven.

Happy Dashain 2018!

 

Wishing all of our family, friends, students, and collaborators a very beautiful Dashain Festival! May goddess Durga bless everyone with health, success, happiness, and love.

Amnesty International’s Long Table Initiative for World Refugee Day on June 20

 

As a follow-up to our newly established partnership formed at the 1Journey Festival earlier this month, we had a very productive evening working with Arielle Newton, Mid-Atlantic Organizer, and Anashua Dutta of Amnesty International, along with an impressive group of activists to discuss ideas for expanding the grassroots movement on the #IWELCOME campaign for refugees. June 20 will mark International Refugee Day – We hope it will also be a day of meaningful dialogue and exchange about this issue, which affects each and every one of us. Stay tuned for how you can contribute and be part of the conversation of inclusion!

Celebrating Refugees

 

We had an epic day at the One Journey Festival held on the lawn outside the impressive National Cathedral in Washington DC. The weather was on our side, the artists were amazing, the food delicious, the music terrific, and the message clear: Welcome Refugees. Thanks to all of our beautiful and talented dancers who participated in the event – you were awesome! We can’t wait for next year!!

 

 

Celebrate Refugees at Washington National Cathedral June 2

 

Join us tomorrow, rain or shine, at the One Journey Festival at the Washington National Cathedral! Enjoy dance, music, food, fashion, activities for children and more! The event is free. We hope to see you at our performance of Himalayan and Indian dances and at our workshop. Come celebrate the talents and contributions of refugees from around the world. https://goo.gl/8z2G1t

One Journey Festival Kicks Off on June 2

 

Come be a part of the #1journeyfest on the lawn of Washington National Cathedral in Washington, DC. next Saturday, June 2. Join familiar faces from the world of fashion and cuisine as well as the arts. We’ll be there sharing #Himalayan and #Indian dance and storytelling #withrefugees. Plan to spend the day with us show your support and appreciation for these amazing people whose talents and skills enrich us all. To learn more about refugees around the world visit @refugeestudies of the University of Oxford on Twitter.

The Multidimensionality of the Refugee Issue

Refugees are often seen as a burden on society, however, we tend to ignore the multidimensionality of this issue. Refugees have a wealth of life experience, talents, skills, as well as resiliency. They can be, and are, contributors in so many areas. To ignore that potential is to bypass an opportunity to show our humanity, our compassion, and our desire for inclusivity. In short, the ‘refugee crises’ is, as this article states, more of a ‘crisis in response’. Come join us @1journeyfestival to share tales of hardship and joy, challenge and triumph. Witness some of the beauty and #culturaldiversity that refugees bring with them through the mediums of dance, music, food, and the arts. https://goo.gl/PdQis8